Canada's Physical Activity Guidelines

PRACTITIONER's Guide

THE STEPS

GET MOVING

An easier version of the recommended guidelines used as a preliminary  plan to improve adherence.

GET ACTIVE

The guidelines with an example of what the training program can entail.

GET HEALTHY

A progression of the guidelines used to extend the benefits and transfer into other activities.

Step 1:

GET MOVING

Minutes of Aerobic Physical Activity

Per Week 

120

Moderate Intensity

Muscle and Bone Strengthening Activities 

Per Week 

2 Times

Using major muscle groups

In bouts of 5 minutes or more

Main Goals

  • Introduce planned exercise

  • Find and minimize joint restrictions

  • Create positive training mentality

  • Create feasible short and long term goals

  • Minimize everyday aches and pains

Most people try to do too much too soon, thinking that by doing so they will have the quickest result. Truth is the best way is slow gradual steps, allowing the body to adapt as well as the individual to have multiple small successes that add up to a large long term goal.

The use of bands allows tension to be placed on specific muscle groups

Step 2:

GET ACTIVE

Minutes of Aerobic Physical Activity

Per Week 

150

Moderate to Vigorous

Intensity

Muscle and Bone Strengthening Activities 

Per Week 

2 Times

Using major muscle groups

In bouts of 10 minutes or more

Main Goals

  • Introduce vigorous physical activity intensity

  • Introduce Fundamental Movement Patterns

  • Use partial range of motion of compound movements to facilitate better learning

Once we know each joint is capable of movement and is able to be loaded in different angles, we need to start introducing exercises that allow the participant to use these muscles in different positions that mimic movements they find in their everyday lives.

As per this article from the NSCA:

THE PRIMARY 7

1. Hinge

hip-dominant movements

(deadlift variations, swing patterns, bridges)

2. Knee-Dominant

bilateral/unilateral knee-dominant movements

(squat variations, split squats, multi-planar squats, and all lunge variations)

3. Rotation

the active rotation of the core of the body with effects up and down the kinetic chain

(medicine ball throws, cable chops)

4. Horizontal Push

movements that push a resistance away from our center of mass utilizing the chest musculature

(bench press, push-ups)

5. Horizontal Pull

movements that pull a resistance towards our center of mass with use of our back musculature

(rowing variations, face pulls)

6. Vertical Push

movements that push a resistance above our heads utilizing the shoulder musculature

(overhead press, military press, handstands) 

7. Vertical Pull

movements that pull a resistance from above our head towards our center of mass utilizing the back musculature

(pull-ups, chin-ups, pulldowns)

THE FUNCTIONAL 3

8. Stability (or anti-movements)

prevent motion, anti-flexion, anti-extension, anti-rotation

(deadlifts, planks, and Paloff presses)

9. Gait

Movements that are unloaded and move us through space

(crawl, walk, run, sprint, and bound)

10. Cross Pollination

knee-dominant movements with addition of locomotion

(walking lunges, reverse lunges, side lunges)

An example of what a squat progression could be, allowing enough variables to challenge the participant appropriately.

Step 3:

GET HEALTHY

Minutes of Aerobic Physical Activity

Per Week 

180

Moderate to Vigorous

Intensity

Muscle and Bone Strengthening Activities 

Per Week 

3 Times

Using major muscle groups

In bouts of 15 minutes or more

Main Goals

  • Introduce body composition improvement

  • Use full range of motion exercises for movements

  • Introduce training plans such as:

    • High Intensity Interval Training​

    • Strength Training

    • Plyometric progressions

For the final phase of this guide, the implementation of weight control is finally introduced. Once we know the joints are capable of movement, that exercises are now variations of a set of fundamental movement skills, then we have the necessary tools to tackle body composition.

An example of body fat ranges for males and females

Although not necessary, the implementation of high interval intensity training has been shown to improve physical fitness better than just weight training alone. A study by Petersen, Hastings, & Gottschall (2016) compared two groups, HIIT and FIT, with HIIT replacing one of their moderate intensity weight training session with HIIT training

 

These are their results: 

 Peak oxygen consumption and leg strength increased significantly for the HIIT group

(+9.7% and 11.9% respectively) but not the FIT group.

Significant decreases in the HIIT group for

blood pressure (-9.9%), fasting blood glucose (-7.0%), total cholesterol (-6.0%),

LDL cholesterol (-7.8%), triglycerides (-16.3%) and fat mass (-1.1%). 

References

Mullins,A. (2018). Programming the General Population for Optimal Fitness - 10 Important Movement Patterns. Retrieved from https://www.nsca.com/education/articles/ptq/programing-the-general-population-for-optimal-fitness10-important-movement-patterns/

Petersen, B. A., Hastings, B., & Gottschall, J. S. (2016). High Intensity Interval Cycling Improves Physical Fitness in Trained Adults. Journal of Fitness Research, 5(1), 39–47. Retrieved from https://0-search-ebscohost-com.orca.douglascollege.ca/login.aspx?direct=true&db=s3h&AN=116594624&site=ehost-live&scope=site

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©2017 By Angelo Matoza Trinidad.